Archive | January, 2012

Imaggeo on Mondays: Zurich lit by lightning

30 Jan

Zurich lit by lightning by Ryan Teuling, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

Zurich lit by lightning by Ryan Teuling, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

In Zurich, Switzerland, June is often the wettest month of the year. Summer thunderstorms that give clouds a purple-grey colour and bright up the skies with strong lightning bolts are common place. This picture, taken by Ryan Teuling from Wageningen University in the Netherlands, captures one of these bolts, lighting up the centre of the city.Teuling took this photo in June 2008 when he worked at the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science (CHN) in Zurich, following the Institute’s yearly barbecue.

“From the upper floor of the CHN building we had a great view of the centre of Zurich, the lake, and the active lightning. The lightning was so intense that I could take the picture by controlling the shutter by hand in response to lightning flashes, and not in automatic or repeat mode,” Teuling said. The storm front was stationary over Lake Zurich, visible in the centre of the frame, he added.

Thunderstorms occur when warm, moist air rises rapidly upwards, cools and condenses forming clouds and water droplets. These strong convective cells of air develop easily in the diverse topography of Zurich, a city located in a valley in the north tip of Lake Zurich, near the Albis chain of hills.

Imaggeo is the online open access geosciences image repository of the European Geosciences Union. Every geoscientist who is an amateur photographer (but also other people) can submit their images to this repository. Being open access, it can be used by scientists for their presentations or publications as well as by the press. If you submit your images to imaggeo, you retain full rights of use, since they are licenced and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

Register for the EGU General Assembly 2012

25 Jan

Online registration to the 2012 General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) is open until 22 March 2012. The meeting, taking place in Vienna from 22–27 April, brings together over 10,000 scientists from all over the world and covers all disciplines of the Earth, planetary, and space sciences.

To register, you will need to create an account with Copernicus, our meeting’s organiser, if you don’t already have one. The registration fee includes the participation in the meeting, free local transportation from Monday–Friday, 23–27 April 2012, the information & schedules book, along with the abstracts USB flash drive.

You also have the option to contribute to EGU on Renewables, a programme to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and to help support EGU Outreach activities. These include co-sponsoring meetings, such as the Alexander von Humboldt conferences, organising the GIFT programmes for teachers, and running this blog, among many others.

The General Assembly will be held at the Austria Center Vienna at Bruno-Kreisky-Platz 1, Vienna, Austria. For more information about the venue and how to get there, please refer to the Venue page on the General Assembly website. For information on accommodation options, see the Accommodation page.

With over 13,800 abstracts submitted and a preliminary programme featuring more than 700 scientific sessions, the 2012 General Assembly is set to be a great success. We look forward to welcoming you in Vienna!

Imaggeo on Mondays: El Tatio geyser field

23 Jan

El Tatio Geyser Field by Simon Gascoin, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

El Tatio Geyser Field by Simon Gascoin, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

Excursions following scientific conferences often give researchers a chance to observe geosciences phenomena in remote areas. That was the case for Simon Gascoin, from the Centre d’Etudes Spatiales de la Biosphère in Toulouse, France who got to photograph geysers in a Chilean desert after the EGU Alexander von Humboldt conference in Santiago de Chile in late 2008.

“The picture shows the El Tatio geyser field, located at 4,200 metres above sea level, in the hyperarid Atacama desert. Steam columns and boiling water are caused by the high geothermal fluxes in this volcanic region, which heat the groundwater,” Gascoin explained.

The El Tatio geyser field is the largest geyser field in the southern hemisphere with no less than 80 active geysers. Eruptions of groundwater heated by magma at El Tatio have an average height of 75 centimetres, but the record steam and water jet reached some six metres above ground.

The Chilean Government declared the field a protected area in 2010.

Imaggeo is the online open access geosciences image repository of the European Geosciences Union. Every geoscientist who is an amateur photographer (but also other people) can submit their images to this repository. Being open access, it can be used by scientists for their presentations or publications as well as by the press. If you submit your images to imaggeo, you retain full rights of use, since they are licenced and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

Become a freelance writer for the EGU newsletter!

18 Jan

Interested in science writing? Are you looking to get published and get paid for it? Keep reading.

The newsletter of the European Geosciences Union, currently known as The Eggs, is a magazine and information service distributed for free to all EGU members — around 12,000 scientists. It will be rebranded and relaunched in late February or early March with a new layout, content structure, and name: GeoQ. The new version will keep much of the informative material of its predecessor, but will also see some changes. In particular, we want to feature even more pieces on recent research in the earth, planetary and space sciences written for a general (technical) audience.

We are looking for young scientists or established researchers with a demonstrable passion and aptitude for science communication interested in writing for GeoQ on a freelance basis. Science writers are also welcome to apply to contribute to the newsletter. Freelancers will not only see their texts published in a magazine with a wide readership, but will also receive a €100 Amazon voucher per 800 to 1000-words article as payment.

If you are interested in this opportunity, contact GeoQ’s Chief Editor, Bárbara T. Ferreira, at geoq@egu.eu for more information.

GeoQ, the new EGU newsletter. Coming soon!

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: