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GeoTalk: Meet Anna Rabitti, winner of I’m a Geoscientist, Get me out of here!

22 Aug

Earlier this year we ran the first ever I’m a Geoscientist, Get me out of here! event, an online chat-based game show in which school kids vote for their favourite geoscience communicators. In this week’s GeoTalk, Sara Mynott  talks to Anna Rabitti, an oceanography PhD student and winner of this year’s I’m a Geoscientist…

 

Meet Anna. (Credit: Anna Rabitti)

Meet Anna. (Credit: Anna Rabitti)

First, for those who haven’t been following I’m a Geoscientist, can you tell us a little about yourself and what made you decide to take part in the competition?

My name is Anna, I am Italian, and I moved to a tiny Dutch Island in the North Sea almost five years ago (after getting my masters in Physics) to work on my PhD project in physical oceanography at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, NIOZ.

My PhD project is about internal waves in the equatorial ocean, and how they may interact with the peculiar ocean dynamics at the equator. I use observations of current speed, temperature and salinity from the deep equatorial Atlantic, as well as other analytical tools to find out more about internal waves in confined basins. In the last year I have been also involved in a big European project called MIDAS, helping to characterise the oceanographic conditions of sites that could suitable for deep-sea mining.

I have always liked to share the things I learn and work with people who are not directly involved in science – I see it as compelling responsibility to society. However in the last few years it has been very difficult for me to fulfil this desire as I live in a foreign country whose language I do not really master.

That is why, when I saw the I’m a Geoscientist initiative advertised by the EGU, I did not hesitate to apply for it. It is in English, you can do it from your office, and it gives you the opportunity to be in contact with many kids and teachers from different countries. It is really a great educational experience, for all sides.

Have you done any geoscience outreach before?

In the past, I have been involved in initiatives to promote scientific thinking as a tool that every citizen can use to make conscious social and economic choices. However, I have never really focused only on geoscience before. So far, my experience has been limited to classic public debates and workshops and I’m a Geoscientist was the first time I’ve had the opportunity to interact with so many people through online chats and forums.

What was your toughest question during the competition and how did you respond?

Any of the questions that involved ethical or moral choices. For example this one: “Don’t you think that if a person was to cut a whole tree off, then they have to plant 10 more trees so that the levels of global warming can decrease?”

I am sure that this was asked with the best intentions, and that the student asking this was really willing to positively act to mitigate human induced climate change. However, I found it hard to explain the importance of reconsidering our attitude towards the exploitation of natural resources.

Why, first of all, did the person cut that tree? We are experiencing a very difficult time in human history, when access to resources like fossil fuels and water are the causes of social and economic tension. By the time those ten trees have grown, it might be too late to change our habits. These are very delicate and important issues. Explaining them is crucial, since the actual situation is definitely asking for immediate action, but is also very challenging – especially when you do not have your audience in front of you and you cannot appreciate their reaction immediately. I really hope I succeeded in communicating the urgency of the issue, without scaring the students too much.

What was the question you appreciated the most?

We received so many good questions from the students, some of them very challenging, from life on our (and other) planets to what it is like to travel at the speed of light; from the role of waves in the ocean to the mitigation of earthquake hazards. However, if I have to pick one, I guess I will vote for “How do you know what it is inside of our planet, if no one has ever been there? Suppositions?”.

I find it a very direct and honest question, driven by pure scientific curiosity – I see a brilliant scientific mind behind it!

Among the non-scientific questions we received, I would definitely go for the question asking if Atlantis ever existed. There’s been no scientific proof of Atlantis so far, but my advice is to keep an eye open when sailing on the Atlantic Ocean… you never know what you might find! Students need to know that scientists are allowed to have dreams too.

The ferry between Den Helder and the island of Texel, where the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, NIOZ, is located. The ferry is equipped with scientific instruments measuring, at each crossing, several properties of the water: temperature and salinity via the CTD (Conductivity, Temperature and Depth sensor), velocity via the two ADCPs (Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers) and colour of the sea and sky via the on-board radiometers. Data are then displayed in real time to all passengers thanks to two screens on the main deck. (Credit: Eric Wagemaakers)

The ferry between Den Helder and the island of Texel, where the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, NIOZ, is located. The ferry is equipped with scientific instruments measuring, at each crossing, several properties of the water: temperature and salinity via the CTD (Conductivity, Temperature and Depth sensor), velocity via the two ADCPs (Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers) and colour of the sea and sky via the on-board radiometers. Data are then displayed in real time to all passengers thanks to two screens on the main deck. (Credit: Eric Wagemaakers)

You’re the lucky winner of 500 euros, how do you hope to spend it?

The island where my research institute (NIOZ) is located and the mainland are connected with a ferry service that sails every half hour. Since 1998 the ferry has been equipped with scientific instruments that take measurements of current velocity, temperature, salinity and other parameters of the water, such as suspended matter and chlorophyll content, every time the ship crosses the channel. These data are used by my colleagues here at the institute to monitor and understand the delicate ecosystem of the Dutch Wadden Sea, but they are also displayed in real time to passengers on two huge screens.

The institute’s other scientific activities are also shown, as well as pictures taken during research cruises or laboratory or field experiments – I think this is a very effective outreach activity, since it shows citizens, locals and tourists that someone is studying the sea right there, and right then, and that they can be proud of having such an institute on this tiny island.

Highlights of scientific findings are shown to the public with simple pictures: once on dry land, they will perhaps think about the science behind waves, seals, local fish and seaweed, and about the delicate balance that links all these elements together.

Back to the prize. In late 2015 a new ship will start sailing along with the old one. Building a big ship, as you can imagine, takes a lot of time, and we are already planning which instruments, display screens and facilities will be put on board, continuing and improving this precious time series. I thought to add the prize to the money already invested for the scientific equipment on the upcoming new ferry. Unfortunately, no oceanographic instrument can be purchased with 500 euros (they are expensive!), but a new, possibly interactive way to display the measurements to the passengers (an extra screen? An interactive tablet to surf the real time data?) could work.

What’s your top tip for aspiring geoscientists?

Being at the beginning of my career, I consider myself an aspiring geoscientist too, therefore a tip, but also a reminder to myself, could be: being a (geo)scientist is a job like many others, so be professional and make sure you are treated professionally. Being passionate about what you do as a job is sometimes dangerous, because the line between hobby and job gets blurred, and you are likely to give up some work rights with the excuse of “doing what you like”.

It is important then to remember that being a good scientist is a challenging task, it requires time, imagination and discipline (and, often, money). It follows that good working conditions and at least some job security are at the base of good science, but these things are aren’t always available in the academic system. It is the responsibility of the whole scientific community to improve this situation, not only for the scientists of today, but also for those aspiring (geo)scientists that will make up the community tomorrow.

Would you recommend taking part to I’m a Geoscientist to your colleagues?

Sure, no doubt about it! If you are interested in scientific outreach and in the interaction between science and society, I think I’m a Geoscientist can be a very good starting point: it asks you for only two weeks of your time, and a few hours per day, and you do not have to move from your office.

In turn, it gives you the opportunity to interact with many students and teachers from all over the world, as well as with the other scientists taking part to the initiative, and helps you to form opinions about so many different topics that you will surely learn a lot yourself. I would definitely recommend it to scientists of all ages: I think students would also largely benefit from the interaction with scientists at different stages of their careers.

By Sara Mynott, former EGU Communications Officer, as of September Phd student in marine biology at the University of Exeter.

GeoEd: The Future’s Bright

20 Aug

What got you hooked to science in the first place? More importantly, what or who persuaded you that making science your career was, not only worth considering, but should be actively pursed? I’m sure, I am preaching to the converted; we all think science is not only cool, but a worthwhile and rewarding career path; so why is it that we can’t enthuse the younger generations that it is the case too? In this GeoEd post, Sam Illingworth highlights STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) careers and why maybe it’s time we broke down some old stereotypes.

The Wellcome Trust Monitor was originally conceived in 2009 as a means to track over time the UK publics’ interest in, attitudes towards, and experience and knowledge of science. Of the 306 young people, aged between 14 and 18 years, interviewed for the 2013 report, 82 % stated that they found their school science lessons to be interesting. However, whilst 82 % of them also considered science to be a good area of employment to go into (citing good pay, interesting work, and the ability to make interesting discoveries as the main reasons for thinking so), 63 % of them said that they actually knew little or nothing about careers in science.

Are students not getting enough science-specific career information? (Photo credit: BrokenSphere)

Are students not getting enough science-specific career information? (Photo credit: BrokenSphere)

The prevailing view of the typical science career progression is that young children initially have a high level of interest in science, but that, as they move through the educational system, interest is lost at every stage. Whilst the results of the Wellcome Trust’s survey would seem to indicate that there is still enthusiasm in science subjects at the secondary school level (11 – 18 years old), they also suggest that science-related careers may not be pursued by young people because of a lack of information, rather than because of a lack of desire.

With most young people saying that they received careers advice from either their family (67%) or teacher (49%), there is the possibility that their future career paths are being biased towards areas in which these sources are able to provided guided support. Even more alarmingly, only 10% of young people thought that careers advice from a real-life scientist was amongst the most useful that they could receive. Is this because they do not wish to pursue a science-related career, or because they do not identify with scientists as people like them, but rather see them as stereotypical caricatures?

Would you approach this man for careers advice? (Photo credit: antilived)

Would you approach this man for careers advice? (Photo credit: antilived)

It is important for school students to realise that pursuing a science degree at University does not mean that you end up working in a laboratory wearing a white coat and safety goggles. Whilst this might be perceived as an ideal job for a small proportion of students it is by no means the norm, and so as scientists, and as science graduates, we have a responsibility to not only highlight the wide diversity of science and scientists, but also the large number of other opportunities that are available to science graduates outside of the realms of academia and research.

At my institution (Manchester Metropolitan University), some of the job roles that our science graduates were pursuing within 6 months of graduating included: aviation security officer, custom bike designer, defence officer, education assistant for a charitable organisation, web content writer, restaurant owner, and professional rugby player! This is obviously a very varied list, and the fact that almost 90 % of all our 2012/13 Science & Engineering leavers went into work and/or further study 6 months after graduation is representative of the demand for science undergraduates, even in the current economic climate.

A scrum of science graduates? (Photo credit: Thomas Faivre-Duboz)

A scrum of science graduates? (Photo credit: Thomas Faivre-Duboz)

As scientists we have the opportunity to encourage school students to contemplate a career in science as an achievable and exciting option, and also to encourage them to think about the different opportunities that a science degree could afford them. We can do this through a variety of school outreach activities such as career fairs, one-to-one interviews, and the sharing of resources with both the students and the educators. One great resource that we could share is EGU’s database for undergraduate and postgraduate courses, which has a list of a range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses spanning the geosciences across Europe, and which has been designed specifically for those who would like to search for courses based on a specific subject area, rather than by university. It is worth noting that the EGU also offers a platform for job seekers to find vacancies in the Earth, planetary, and space sciences. Research positions relevant to both recent graduates and early career researchers can be found here.

As well as showcasing the interesting research with which we are involved, as scientists we have a responsibility to make ourselves more approachable to students as a source of relevant and useful career advice. So the next time you are in front of a group of school children demonstrating the fun and fascinating world of science, be prepared to spare a moment to discuss your own scientific journey, and the many varied and exciting career paths that studying science at undergraduate level and beyond can result in.

 

By Sam Illingworth, Lecturer, Manchester Metropolitan University

EGU has a new Science Communication Officer!

6 Aug

Meet the newest member of EGU’s communications team, Laura Roberts Artal! Laura will manage GeoLog and the EGU blog network, run our social media channels, and continue developing EGU’s networking activities for young scientists.

It is a warm and relatively sunny day in Munich and I’ve just started as the new Communications Officer at the EGU! Some of you may recognise me, as I’ve been blogging as part of the EGU blog network over on Geology Jenga for approximately a year.

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I completed an undergraduate Masters in Geology at the University of Liverpool, where I investigated how and why magma/water interactions lead to typically explosive eruptions. Once I graduated, I spent three years in industry as an environmental consultant working on land contamination issues, before returning to Liverpool University to undertake a PhD researching whether the Earth had a magnetic field during the Archean, 3.5 billion years ago.

During my PhD I have become an advocate for science outreach and communication. This has led me to regularly volunteer for the STEM Ambassador Network and Science Grrl, at outreach and public engagement events across the UK; designing and developing interactive activates for children and adults alike to raise the profile of Earth Sciences amongst the general public.

Up until a few days ago Sara Mynott was the science communication guru here at EGU and I’ve got some very big shoes to fill! However, I am extremely excited by this new challenge and looking forward to spreading the word about all things Earth Science via the EGU blog and the wide variety of social media platforms that EGU has a presence in. To do so, I’ll be working closely with the EGU’s Media and Communications Manager, Bárbara Ferreira.

Feel free to get in touch with me at roberts@egu.eu if you have any questions about the EGU or any of its publications – it would be great to hear from you!

Laura Roberts
@LauRob85

Announcing the winners of the EGU Photo Contest 2014!

2 May

The selection committee received over 200 photos for this year’s EGU Photo Contest, covering fields across the geosciences. Participants have been voting for their favourites throughout the week  and there are three clear winners. Congratulations to Trent Marwick, Velio Coviello and John Clemens – 2014’s fantastic photographers!

Star Trails in Rocky Mountain National Park by Trent Marwick (via imaggeo.egu.eu).

Stands of Time by Trent Marwick (via imaggeo.egu.eu).

Eventually water by Velio Coviello (via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Eventually water by Velio Coviello (via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Erosion Spider

Erosion Spider by John Clemens (via imaggeo.egu.eu).

Imaggeo is the EGU’s open access geosciences image repository. Photos uploaded to Imaggeo can be used by scientists, the press and the public provided the original author is credited. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. You can submit your photos here.

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