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EGU 2014 Communicate Your Science Video Competition

19 Mar

Earlier this year we launched the Communicate Your Science Video Competition, a great opportunity to share research in the Earth, planetary and space sciences with the general public. What’s more, there’s a free registration to the 2015 General Assembly up for grabs and we’ve just extended the deadline to give you more time to get filming!

What’s it about?

Young scientists pre-registered for the EGU General Assembly are invited to take part in the EGU’s first ever Communicate Your Science Video Competition.

The aim: to produce a video up-to-three-minutes long to share your research with the general public.

The prize: a free registration to the General Assembly in 2015.

Your video can include scenes of you out in the field and explaining an outcrop, or at the lab bench showing how to work out water chemistry; entries can also cartoons, animations (including stop motion), or music videos – you name it! As long as you’re explaining concepts in the Earth, planetary and space sciences in a language suitable for a general audience, you can be as creative as you like.

Need some inspiration? Sam Illingworth has put together a poetic example:

How to enter

Send your video to Sara Mynott (mynott@egu.eu) by 5 April, together with proof of online pre-registration to EGU 2014. Video files can be large, so we recommended using Dropbox, Wetransfer, or an alternative file-sharing service

Check the EGU website for more information about the competition and pre-register for the conference on the EGU 2014 website.

Shortlisted videos will be showcased on the EGU YouTube Channel shortly before the General Assembly.  In the run up to the conference, and during the meeting, viewers can vote for their favourite film by clicking on the video’s ‘like’ button. The winning video will be the one with the most likes by the end of the General Assembly.

Any questions? Just send an email to mynott@egu.eu.

Communicate Your Science Video Competition at EGU 2014!

29 Jan

Want to communicate your research to a wider audience and try your hand at video production? Now’s your chance! Young scientists pre-registered for the EGU General Assembly are invited to take part in the EGU’s first ever Communicate Your Science Video Competition!

The aim is to produce a video up-to-three-minutes long to share your research with the general public. The winning entry will receive a free registration to the General Assembly in 2015.

Your video can include scenes of you out in the field and explaining an outcrop, or at the lab bench showing how to work out water chemistry; entries can also cartoons, animations (including stop motion), or music videos – you name it! As long as you’re explaining concepts in the Earth, planetary and space sciences in a language suitable for a general audience, you can be as creative as you like.

Here’s one we made earlier! Sam Illingworth, who represents young scientists on the Programme Committee of the General Assembly, speaks about all things methane:

Feeling inspired? Send your video to Sara Mynott (mynott@egu.eu) by 5 April, together with proof of online pre-registration to EGU 2014. Check the EGU website for more information about the competition and pre-register for the conference on the EGU 2014 website

Shortlisted videos will be showcased on the EGU YouTube Channel in April, when voting opens! In the run up to the General Assembly and during the conference, viewers can vote for their favourite film by clicking on the video’s ‘like’ button. The winning video will be the one with the most likes by the end of the General Assembly.

What are you waiting for? Take the chance to showcase your research and spread great geoscientific facts with the world!

Update (18/03/14): Competition deadline extended to 5 April 2014

Showcase your film at GeoCinema!

8 Nov

Every year, we showcase a great selection of geoscience films at the EGU General Assembly and after four successful years we will again be running GeoCinema in 2014. If you’ve shadowed a scientist in the lab, filmed fantastic spectacles in the field, or have produced an educational feature on the Earth, planetary or space sciences, we want to hear from you.

GeoCinema features short clips and longer films related to the geosciences, and from animations to interviews, all films are welcome. If you would like to contribute to this popular event, please fill out the submission form by 20 December 2013.

To get a feel for what we have screened in previous years, take a look at the online archive, with films that explore all facets of geoscience – from ocean depths to outer space.

Suitable films will be screened at GeoCinema during the EGU 2014 General Assembly in Vienna (27 April–2 May 2014). Note that you must be able to provide us with the film on DVD and you must have appropriate permission to show the feature in a public venue.

Just a Sample - GeoCinema

If you have any questions about GeoCinema, or the submissions process, please send an email to geocinema@egu.eu.

GeoCinema Online: The extremes

2 Aug

In our final instalment of GeoCinema Online, we’ve put together a collection of climate and weather documentaries covering the incredibly hot and incredibly cold, together with the extreme events that shape our planet. Settle into your sofa and enjoy some scintillating science!

Fennec: Into the Saharan Cauldron

The central Sahara has one of the most extreme climates on Earth, but prior to the Fennec expedition, little was known about the impact this region had on the rest of the world’s weather patterns. This short film covers the story of the observations made of the Central Sahara in the summers of 2011 and 2012. It tells the story of a dedicated set of specialists both on the ground and in the air who managed to deliver the most comprehensive field campaign ever mounted in this fiercely hot and inhospitable region.

The Boiling Sea

The Mediterranean, especially the deeper parts, is warming up faster than the other seas on the planet. This film takes a look at the effect this is having on the Mediterranean ecosystem as a whole, from nutrient fluxes and algal blooms to the impact declining fish populations are having on local economies. Drawing on the regions geological history and our present interaction with the environment The Boiling Sea documents the history of the Mediterranean region and proposes new solutions to problems currently faced here.

Expedition Blue Planet: Age of Limits

The Colorado River powers city lights and fuel urban growth and agriculture, supplying the energy demands of 30 million people across seven states through the Hover Dam. Today, a combination of drought and overuse have drained it half dry leaving a 135 foot high “bathtub ring” mark around Lake Mead. This film explores what the future holds for the region.

Towards Absolute Zero

And in “Towards Absolute Zero” Oxford sparks presents a ride to the land of the extremely cold in a short and informative animation.

Dead Heat

This film takes a closer look at extreme weather events and highlights the importance of accurate meteorological records. Using a blog to challenge a historical temperature record in El Azizia, Lybia – a suspicious 58 ºC high. You can watch this one here.

Miss the other GeoCinema posts? Catch up here

Credits

Fennec: Into the Saharan Cauldron: National Centre for Atmospheric Science (source)

The Boiling Sea: While Fox Communications (source)

Expedition Blue Planet: Age of Limits: Good Morning Beautiful Films (source)

Towards Absolute Zero: Oxford Sparks (source)

Dead Heat: Weather Underground (source)

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