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GeoCinema Online: Trials and tribulations of field work.

17 Sep

Field work is not without its trials and tribulations, getting there, for instance can be an adventure in itself. Once you arrive you can expect long days, sandwiches for lunch and frustration at losing your way or equipment not working as you expect it to. Despite all of that, one of the primary draws of the geosciences is being able to spend time in the great outdoors. In the fourth instalment of GeoCinema there is something for everyone as we track scientist living in Antarctica, undergraduates trying to map a 15km2  area in Greenland and a PhD student who spends her time high up in the tree canopy. Grab a drink and get comfortable, the show is about to begin.

Are you ready? Inspirational moments in Antarctica

A short music video contains sequences of science in action which captures a little of how it feels to travel to and work in Antarctica.

British Antarctic Survey Halley Research Station

Living in Antarctica is no mean feat, especially whilst attempting to carry out lengthy field seasons, in fact, to some it might seem utter madness. However, the British Antarctic Survey’s Halley Research Station, a new facility to support world-leading science by offering living quarters as well as research facilities, has been built on the icy landscape.

An Undergraduate Mapping Project
This educational film follows 4 Oxford University undergraduates as they complete their mapping projects and describes the methodology used and experiences gained on the trip. It includes footage from Greenland, photographs and animated diagrams, making geology accessible to people with little knowledge of the subject. The main goal of the film is to inspire secondary school students to undertake fieldwork and study Earth Sciences.

Into the Deep Forest: Remote Sensing and Tropical Leaf Phenology: A PhD in the Amazonian Canopy.

Published research with its detailed graphs, elaborate methodologies and analysis doesn’t provide a means to showcase all the work that goes on behind the scenes. In this film a researcher showcases the first two years of her PhD, spent up high in the canopy of the Amazon rainforest.

 

Have you missed any of the series so far? Catch up with space science here or learn about carbon capture and storage instead.

Stay tuned to the blog for more films!

Credits

Are you ready? Inspirational moments in Antarctica: Linda Capper, http://youtu.be/8CmKwXXPkgg

British Antarctic Survey Halley Research Station: Linda Capper, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDIi7rP_WBA

An Undergraduate Mapping Project: Eleni Wood, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xd5H-14WLzA

Into the Deep Forest: Remote Sensing and Tropical Leaf Phenology: A PhD in the Amazonian Canopy: Cecilia Chavana-Bryant, http://vimeo.com/46676651.

GeoCinema Online: Our changing Climate

3 Sep

Welcome to the third instalment of Geocinema! The focus this week is on climate change and how it impacts on local communities. Sit back, relax and make sure you’ve got a big bucket of popcorn on the go, as this post features a selection of short documentaries as well as trailers of feature length films.

Documenting the effects of the warming conditions on the surface of our planet is the primary focus of many researchers but understanding how these changes directly affect communities is just as important. The two are intrinsically linked and the films this week  highlight just to what extent this is true.

Thin Ice

In this feature film, a global community of researchers, from the University of Oxford and the Victoria University of Wellington, race to understand the science behind global warming and our planet’s changing climate.

Find detailed information of the project here.

 

High Mountain Glacial Watershed Program

How are communities in mountainous regions affected by significant watershed? In the film, scientist try to find a way to better manage these events.

 

The wisdom to Survive

What are the challenges of adapting to an ever changing climate? The film explores how we can adjusts to living in the wake of this significant challenge through talking to leaders in the realms of science, economics and spirituality.

 

Glacial Balance

Humans have depended on supplies of water since the dawn of mankind.  Ever changing weather patterns means supplies of water are shifting and communities are having to relocate to access fresh provisions. Glacial Balance takes us on a journey from Colombia to Argentina, getting to know those who are affected by melting glacial reserves in the Andes.

 

Enjoyed the series so far? There are more films you can catch up on here and here.

We will explore further facets of our ever changing planet in the next instalment of GeoCinema, stay tuned to the blog for more posts!

Credits

Thin Ice: Keith Suez, http://thiniceclimate.org/

High Mountain Glacial Watershed Program : Daniel Byers, http://skyshipfilms.com/videos

The Wisdom to Survive: Gwendolyn Alston, http://vimeo.com/77314166

Glacial Balance: Ethan Steinman, http://www.glacialbalance.com/

GeoCinema Online: The Geological Storage of CO2

27 Aug

 Welcome to week two of GeoCinema Screenings!

In a time when we can’t escape the fact that anthropogenic emissions are contributing to the warming of the Earth, we must explore all the options to reduce the impact of releasing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. The three films this week tackle the challenge of separating CO2 from other emissions and then storing it in geological formations deep underground (Carbon Capture and Storage, CCS).

Infografics of the CO2 Storage at the pilot site in Ketzin (modified after: Martin Schmidt, www.starteins.de) Credit: http://www.co2ketzin.de/nc/en/home.html

Infografics of the CO2 Storage at the pilot site in Ketzin (modified after: Martin Schmidt, www.starteins.de) Credit: http://www.co2ketzin.de/nc/en/home.html

Geological Conditions and Capacities

Porous rocks with good permeability have, in Germany and world-wide, the highest potential for geological CO2 storage. Where do these rocks occur? And which further criteria do potential CO2 storage sites need to meet?

Ketzin Pilot Site

At the Ketzin pilot site in Brandenburg, Germany, CO2 has been injected into an underground storage formation since June, 2008. …”. The monitoring methods used at the pilot site Ketzin are among the most comprehensive in the field of CO2 storage worldwide. Of importance is the combination of different monitoring methods, each with different temporal and spatial resolutions. Which methods are used? And what has already been learned?

Scientific Drilling at the Pilot Site Ketzin

Well Ktzi203 offers, for the first time, the unique opportunity to gain samples ) from a storage reservoir that have been exposed to CO2 for more than four years. The film follows how the samples were collected and studied.

 

You can view all three films and journey through the exploration of CCS here.

Have you enjoyed the films? Why not take a look the first posts in this series: Saturn and its icy moon or some of the films in last year’s series?

Stay tuned to the next post of Geo Cinema Online for more exciting science videos!

Credits

All three films are developed as part of the Forshungsprojekt, COMPLETE, Pilotstandort Ketzin. (Source).

GeoCinema Online: Saturn and its Icy Moon

13 Aug

It is day three of the General Assembly in Vienna, there are no sessions directly relevant to your research scheduled in the programme for this afternoon and you would really like to take a bit of a break from the hustle and bustle of the main scientific sessions. Where do you head? Down to the Basement (Blue Level) and to the GeoCinema, of course!

GeoCinema has been a regular on the General Assembly Programme for a few years now. The aim is to provide a platform for scientists to communicate their science via the medium of film; some of the movies are stunning displays of our beautiful planet whilst others focus on specific geoscientific or educational issues. It is the perfect place for conference attendees to kick back and relax whilst being taken on a journey to explore the wonders of the Earth and Space.

This year a total of 39 films were screened over the five day period, but given the host of other sessions, talks and discussions available during the Assembly, it’s not surprising you may have missed the one film you really wanted to watch! A series of blog posts (GeoCinema Online) last year, brought the films right into the comfort of your own home (or office) and we’ve continued the series this year too. Over the next few weeks you can look forward to a series of posts which will showcase films and research from some of the most exciting fields across the Earth sciences.

This week Saturn, the giant ringed planet and its moon: Titan take centre stage.

Cassini: 8 Years around Saturn

A video was created using the images taken by Cassini probe of the Saturnian system since 2004.

Propylene on Titan

Too cold for liquid water, and yet it is a lot like Earth – tune into Titan’s secrets.

Credits

Cassini 8 Years around Saturn: Nahum Mendez Chazarra (source)

Propylene on Titan: NASA Goddard (source)

Stay tuned to the next post of GeoCinema Online for more exciting science videos!

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