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Showcase your film at GeoCinema at the General Assembly!

12 Nov

Every year, we showcase a great selection of geoscience films at the EGU General Assembly and after five successful years we will again be running GeoCinema in 2015. If you’ve shadowed a scientist in the lab, filmed fantastic spectacles in the field, or have produced an educational feature on the Earth, planetary or space sciences, we want to hear from you.

GeoCinema features short clips and longer films related to the geosciences, and from animations to interviews, all films are welcome. If you would like to contribute to this popular event, please fill out the submission form by 31 December 2014.

To get a feel for what we have screened in previous years, take a look at the online archive, with films that explore all facets of geoscience – from ocean depths to outer space.

Suitable films will be screened at the GeoCinema room during the EGU 2015 General Assembly in Vienna (12–17 April 2014). Note that you must be able to provide us with the film on DVD and you must have appropriate permission to show the feature in a public venue. Films must be in English or have subtitles in English, since it is the language of the conference. Multiple submissions from the same person are welcome.

For more information, please send us an email or get in touch with our Communications Officer Laura Roberts.

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GeoCinema Online: What a difference technology can make.

8 Oct

Advances in technology mean research that was unthinkable some years ago is now possible. For instance, geographically remote areas which were once out of reach have become more accessible through better (not always easier) transportation, so what we understand by ‘remote areas’ has changed significantly over time. The films in this edition of GeoCinema online are fascinating because they showcase how progress in science know-how mean the advancement of our understanding of planet Earth.

A planetary perspective with Landsat and Google Earth engine

Since July 1972, NASA’s Landsat satellites have gathered images over the entire land surface of the Earth. These images, archived at USGS, reveal dynamic changes over time due to human activity (deforestation, urbanization) and natural processes (volcanic eruptions, wildfire). Now, Google Earth Engine allows scientists, researchers and the public to easily view and analyse this treasure trove of planetary data.

Down to the volcano

A team of scientists have set themselves the goal of building an advanced deep ocean laboratory – on the edge of an active submarine volcano, over a mile below the surface. This research certainly pushes the boundaries of what are considered remote areas!

Project Azolla

How a freshwater fern can provide food, feed & biofuel. This video presents the potential of aquatic farming with a special plant: the fresh-water fern Azolla. The new technology showcased in this video highlights how Azolla provides an innovative way of sustainable, renewable farming.

 

Have you experienced the trials and tribulations of field work? You aren’t alone! As showcased in our last GeoCinema post. If you missed any of the series so far why not catch up here?

Stay tuned to the blog for more films!

Credits

A planetary perspective with Landsat and Google Earth engine: Denise Zmekhol, http://www.zdfilms.com/A-PLANETARY-PERSPECTIVE

Down to the Volcano: Nancy Penrose and Anne Boucher, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIUKej4_XMU

Project Azolla, from floating fern to renewable resource: Dan Brinkhuis, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O34gTsxyDq8&feature=share&list=UU_-wRQieb9Tr5GFfJS8c84A

GeoCinema Online: Trials and tribulations of field work.

17 Sep

Field work is not without its trials and tribulations, getting there, for instance can be an adventure in itself. Once you arrive you can expect long days, sandwiches for lunch and frustration at losing your way or equipment not working as you expect it to. Despite all of that, one of the primary draws of the geosciences is being able to spend time in the great outdoors. In the fourth instalment of GeoCinema there is something for everyone as we track scientist living in Antarctica, undergraduates trying to map a 15km2  area in Greenland and a PhD student who spends her time high up in the tree canopy. Grab a drink and get comfortable, the show is about to begin.

Are you ready? Inspirational moments in Antarctica

A short music video contains sequences of science in action which captures a little of how it feels to travel to and work in Antarctica.

British Antarctic Survey Halley Research Station

Living in Antarctica is no mean feat, especially whilst attempting to carry out lengthy field seasons, in fact, to some it might seem utter madness. However, the British Antarctic Survey’s Halley Research Station, a new facility to support world-leading science by offering living quarters as well as research facilities, has been built on the icy landscape.

An Undergraduate Mapping Project
This educational film follows 4 Oxford University undergraduates as they complete their mapping projects and describes the methodology used and experiences gained on the trip. It includes footage from Greenland, photographs and animated diagrams, making geology accessible to people with little knowledge of the subject. The main goal of the film is to inspire secondary school students to undertake fieldwork and study Earth Sciences.

Into the Deep Forest: Remote Sensing and Tropical Leaf Phenology: A PhD in the Amazonian Canopy.

Published research with its detailed graphs, elaborate methodologies and analysis doesn’t provide a means to showcase all the work that goes on behind the scenes. In this film a researcher showcases the first two years of her PhD, spent up high in the canopy of the Amazon rainforest.

 

Have you missed any of the series so far? Catch up with space science here or learn about carbon capture and storage instead.

Stay tuned to the blog for more films!

Credits

Are you ready? Inspirational moments in Antarctica: Linda Capper, http://youtu.be/8CmKwXXPkgg

British Antarctic Survey Halley Research Station: Linda Capper, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDIi7rP_WBA

An Undergraduate Mapping Project: Eleni Wood, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xd5H-14WLzA

Into the Deep Forest: Remote Sensing and Tropical Leaf Phenology: A PhD in the Amazonian Canopy: Cecilia Chavana-Bryant, http://vimeo.com/46676651.

GeoCinema Online: Our changing Climate

3 Sep

Welcome to the third instalment of Geocinema! The focus this week is on climate change and how it impacts on local communities. Sit back, relax and make sure you’ve got a big bucket of popcorn on the go, as this post features a selection of short documentaries as well as trailers of feature length films.

Documenting the effects of the warming conditions on the surface of our planet is the primary focus of many researchers but understanding how these changes directly affect communities is just as important. The two are intrinsically linked and the films this week  highlight just to what extent this is true.

Thin Ice

In this feature film, a global community of researchers, from the University of Oxford and the Victoria University of Wellington, race to understand the science behind global warming and our planet’s changing climate.

Find detailed information of the project here.

 

High Mountain Glacial Watershed Program

How are communities in mountainous regions affected by significant watershed? In the film, scientist try to find a way to better manage these events.

 

The wisdom to Survive

What are the challenges of adapting to an ever changing climate? The film explores how we can adjusts to living in the wake of this significant challenge through talking to leaders in the realms of science, economics and spirituality.

 

Glacial Balance

Humans have depended on supplies of water since the dawn of mankind.  Ever changing weather patterns means supplies of water are shifting and communities are having to relocate to access fresh provisions. Glacial Balance takes us on a journey from Colombia to Argentina, getting to know those who are affected by melting glacial reserves in the Andes.

 

Enjoyed the series so far? There are more films you can catch up on here and here.

We will explore further facets of our ever changing planet in the next instalment of GeoCinema, stay tuned to the blog for more posts!

Credits

Thin Ice: Keith Suez, http://thiniceclimate.org/

High Mountain Glacial Watershed Program : Daniel Byers, http://skyshipfilms.com/videos

The Wisdom to Survive: Gwendolyn Alston, http://vimeo.com/77314166

Glacial Balance: Ethan Steinman, http://www.glacialbalance.com/

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