Archive | Geodesy RSS feed for this section

GeoCinema Online: Making Measurements

14 Jun

Making measurements from the space and looking to the skies has hugely enhanced our understanding of the Earth, it’s surface processes and its movement in space. This short episode of GeoCinema Online takes you through some of the  great technological developments in the Earth and planetary sciences!

Looking Down a Well: A Brief History of Geodesy

Geodesy is a field of study that deals with the measurement and representation of the Earth, and it all started with something as simple as looking down a well. Over time, the field of geodesy has expanded and evolved dramatically. It now involves radio telescopes, ground surveys and satellites. This video gives a great overview of geodesy and how our measurement techniques have evolved over time.

Using Quasars to Measure the Earth: A Brief History of VLBI

VLBI, or Very Long Baseline Interferometry,  uses multiple radio telescopes to make precise measurements of the Earth’s orientation. It was originally invented to take better pictures of quasars, but scientists soon found out that if you threw the process in reverse, you could measure how the ground beneath the telescopes moved around, how long days really are, and how the Earth wobbles on its axis as it revolves around the sun!

Eyes on the Skies

The invention of the telescope was a revolutionary development in astronomy, dramatically increasing our understanding of outer space. This film takes us on a journey of the telescope’s history: from the technological breakthroughs and scientific discoveries to successes and failures of the people involved in its invention.  While we don’t have the full film, the first chapter is certainly worth investigating – you can take a peek on the Hubble website.

Catch up on some super space science or make sense of natural hazards in earlier posts from the series. Seen them already? Stay tuned for the next episode of GeoCinema Online!

Credits

Looking Down a Well: A Brief History of Geodesy:  NASA Goddard Space Flight Center  (source)

Using Quasars to Measure the Earth: A Brief History of VLBI: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (source)

Eyes on the Skies: ESA (source)

 

EGU General Assembly 2012 Call for Papers

9 Nov

Abstract submission for the EGU General Assembly 2012 (EGU2012) is now open. The General Assembly is being held from Sunday 22 Apr 2012 to Friday 27 Apr 2012 at the Austria Center Vienna, Austria.

You can browse through the Sessions online.

Each Session shows the link Abstract Submission. Using this link you are asked to log in to the Copernicus Office Meeting Organizer. You may submit the text of your contribution as plain text, LaTeX, or MS Word content. Please pay attention to the First Author Rule.

The deadline for the receipt of Abstracts is 17 January 2012. In case you would like to apply for support, please submit no later than 15 December 2011. Information about the financial support available can be found on the Support and Distinction part of the EGU GA 2012 website.

Further information about the EGU General Assembly 2012 on it’s webpages. If you have any questions email the meeting organisers Copernicus.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Akutan Volcano, Alaska

24 Oct

Akutan Volcano, Alaska. Image by Michael Jackson, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons License.

High winds create lenticular clouds off Shishaldin Volcano in the Aleutian Islands. UNAVCO staff installed 16 integrated geophysical instruments including GPS, seismic, tilt, meteorologic instruments on Unimak Island as part of the EarthScope Project.

Imaggeo is the online open access geosciences image repository of the European Geosciences Union. Every geoscientist who is an amateur photographer (but also other people) can submit their images to this repository. Being open access, it can be used by scientists for their presentations or publications as well as by the press. If you submit your images to imaggeo, you retain full rights of use, since they are licenced and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Lofoten Island

12 Sep

Norway-Reine (Lofoten Island). Image by Sokratis Nikoglou, distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons License.

Imaggeo is the online open access geosciences image repository of the European Geosciences Union. Every geoscientist who is an amateur photographer (but also other people) can submit their images to this repository. Being open access, it can be used by scientists for their presentations or publications as well as by the press. If you submit your images to imaggeo, you retain full rights of use, since they are licenced and distributed by EGU under a Creative Commons licence.

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: