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Imaggeo on Mondays: Entering a frozen world

21 Jul

Dmitry Vlasov, a PhD Student and junior scientist from Lomonosov Moscow State University, brings us this week’s Imaggeo on Mondays. He shares his experience of taking part in a student scientific society expedition to Lake Baikal.

This picture shows icy shores of Lake Baikal – a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the world’s largest natural freshwater reservoir (containing about one fifth of Earth’s unfrozen surface freshwater). It is also the deepest lake on our planet (1,642 m).

The icy shores of Lake Baikal. (Credit: Dmitry Vlasov, via imaggeo.egu.eu)

The icy shores of Lake Baikal. (Credit: Dmitry Vlasov, via imaggeo.egu.eu)

The aim of the expedition was to do an eco-geochemical assessment of the environment in and around Ulan-Ude (the capital of Republic of Buryatia). Snow samples were collected all around the city to determine their chemical composition and the concentrations of different chemical elements present in the snowpack. We also studied the isotopic composition of snow to help find the sites where air masses form.

Weather-wise, we were lucky – according to locals this winter was a warm and snowy one. The temperature was (only!) -25 to -33 degrees Celsius. Times were tough when strong, cold and piercing winds froze our hands and faces.

To find out the impact of transport and industry on the snow’s chemical composition within the city, we took background snow samples at different distances and in and around it. One such area was set to the northeast of the city, close to the Turka and Goryachinsk settlements across the notch from Ulan-Ude. This photo was taken in that exact spot. It took about 2.5 hours to make the 170 km journey from Ulan-Ude by car, but we didn’t regret it. The scenery was amazing! The cover of ice over the lake sparkled bright blue, despite being exceptionally transparent. Because of the water’s choppy nature, ice on the Lake Baikal often cracks and billows to form a chain of miniature ice mountains, alternated with relatively smooth ice plains. I’d never seen anything like this before.

All the participants were very excited about expedition – it showed the students different sides of scientific life: work in rather hard weather conditions, analytical lab studies, route planning and of course the breathtaking beauty and outstanding power of nature.

By Dmitry Vlasov, PhD Student and junior scientist, Lomonosov Moscow State University

Acknowledgement:

The expedition was carried out with the financial support of the Russian Geographical Society and the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project № 13-05-41191 and project RGS “Complex Expedition Selenga-Baikal”).

Imaggeo is the EGU’s open access geosciences image repository. Photos uploaded to Imaggeo can be used by scientists, the press and the public provided the original author is credited. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. You can submit your photos here.

Imaggeo on Mondays: The most powerful waterfall in Europe

14 Jul

On the menu this Monday is the opportunity to indulge in some incredible Icelandic geology. Take a look at a tremendous waterfall and the beautiful basalt it cuts through…

Iceland is famous for its striking landscapes, from fiery volcanoes and fields of basalt to violent geysers and pools of the most fantastic blue. One of the country’s many geological gems is Dettifoss waterfall – a 100-metre-high mass of white, tumbling water within Vatnajökull National Park.

With about 200 cubic metres of water falling each second, Dettifoss is widely reported to be the most powerful waterfall in Europe. It certainly looks the part.

Dettifoss waterfall, Iceland (Credit: Neil Davies, via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Dettifoss waterfall, Iceland (Credit: Neil Davies, via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Dettifoss is fed by melt from the Vatna Glacier (Vatnajökull), and the spring spike in meltwater means the fall’s flow can reach some 1500 cubic metres per second. By putting your hand to the rocks beside the fall you can feel the thundering torrents as the basalt vibrates beneath your fingertips.

The Jökulsá river snakes through the park’s volcanic canyons, which are constantly being cut by the erosive force of the fall. Dettifoss isn’t the only great feature in this photo though: the canyon walls are layered with lava flows that – even at a glance – reveal when they were deposited. The relatively smooth deposit at the base of the wall and the thinner skin of smooth basalt in the middle are the product of interglacial eruptions. The two rough, blocky-looking layers are columnar basalt deposits – a feature that forms when lava meets ice and cools so rapidly that it fractures into long, hexagonal columns.

Dettifoss up close. (Credit: Roger McLassus)

Dettifoss up close. (Credit: Roger McLassus)

For many geoscientists, Iceland is the top spot on the geological destination list. If you went to Iceland, where would you go? Been before? Tell the tale. We’d love to hear from you.

By Sara Mynott, EGU Communications Officer

Reference:

Bamlett, M., and Potter, J. F.: Icelandic geology: an explanatory excursion guide based on a 1986 Field Meeting. Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association 99.3, 221-248, 1988.

Imaggeo is the EGU’s open access geosciences image repository. Photos uploaded to Imaggeo can be used by scientists, the press and the public provided the original author is credited. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. You can submit your photos here.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Turkey’s cotton castle

7 Jul

This week, Imaggeo on Mondays is brought to you by Josep Ubalde, who transports us to a wonderful site in western Turkey: a city of hot springs and ancient ruins dubbed cotton castle, after the voluminous white rocks that spread from the spring’s centre…

Pamukkale is lies in Turkey’s inner Aegean region, within an active fault that favours the formation of hot springs. The spring’s hot waters were once used by the ancient Greco-Roman city of Hierapolis, the remains of which sit atop Pamukkale. The entire area – city, springs and all – was declared a World Heritage site in 1988.

Travertine terraces in Pamukkale, Turkey (Credit: Josep M. Ubalde via imaggeo.egu.eu)

Travertine terraces in Pamukkale, Turkey (Credit: Josep M. Ubalde via imaggeo.egu.eu)

The materials that make up Pamukkale are travertines, sedimentary rocks deposited by water from a hot spring. Here, the spring water follows a 320-metre-long channel to the head of the travertine ridge before falling onto large terraces, each of which are about 60-70 metres long.

The travertines are formed in cascading pools that step down in a series of natural white balconies. These travertines are 300 metres high and their shape and colour lend them the name Pamukkale, meaning “cotton castle”.

At its source, the water temperature ranges between 35 and 60 degrees Celsius, and it contains a high concentration of calcium carbonate (over 80 ppm). When this carbonate-rich water comes into contact with the air, it evaporates and leaves deposits of calcium carbonate behind. Initially, the deposits are like a soft jelly, but over the time they harden to form the solid terraces you see here.

Putting Pamukkale into perspective (Credit: Josep M. Ubalde)

Putting Pamukkale into perspective (Credit: Josep M. Ubalde)

These travertines have been forming for the last 400,000 years. The rate they form is affected by weather conditions, ambient temperature, and the duration of water flow from the spring. It is estimated that 500 milligrams of calcium carbonate is deposited on the travertine for every litre of water. Today, thermal water is released over the terraces in a controlled programme to help preserve this natural wonder. You can no longer walk on them, but they are beautiful to behold.

By Josep M. Ubalde, Soil Scientist, Miguel Torres Winery

Imaggeo is the EGU’s open access geosciences image repository. Photos uploaded to Imaggeo can be used by scientists, the press and the public provided the original author is credited. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. You can submit your photos here.

Imaggeo on Mondays: Fuelling the clouds with fire

30 Jun

Wildfires frequently break out in the Californian summer. The grass is dry, the ground parched and a small spark can start a raging fire, but burning can begin even when water is about. Gabriele Stiller sets the scene for a blaze beside Mono Lake, exploring the events that got it going and what it may have started in the sky… 

While on shores of Mono Lake in the summer of 2012, I spotted something strange in the distance: a great blaze on the other side of the lake. We were on a trip through the southwestern states (a long tour through California, Nevada, Utah and Arizona). All the days before we had been continuously accompanied by thunderstorms that broke out during the afternoon. The photo was taken before the daily thunderstorm, and the large convective system already hinted to the next storm to come – and indeed it did, just a few hours later.

Desert fires close to Mono Lake, California. (Credit: Gabriele Stiller via imageo.egu.eu)

Desert fires close to Mono Lake, California. (Credit: Gabriele Stiller via imageo.egu.eu)

It was not clear if this convective cloud system was generated by uplift of heated air initiated by the fire, a process known as pyro-convection, or if it was simply a coincidence. After all, thunderstorms were a regular occurrence throughout our trip. This could have been the storm of the day, and the related convection could have transported the air and smoke from the fire upwards. Or a combination of both could have been behind it. The cumulus cloud was quite isolated, with clear sky surrounding it, but you can already see a small anvil developing (the area where ice is formed in the cloud) above the cauliflower-like cumulus – a hint towards a developing thunderstorm. Such a development would make the cloud into a cumulonimbus cloud.

So what caused the blaze? On 8 August 2012, the wildfire was started through lightning ignition by a thunderstorm coming from the Sierra Nevada, and it burned for several days on open grassland, far from human infrastructure. Due to these circumstances, firefighting was not particularly difficult for the authorities. However, more than 13000 acres were burned, and more than 500 people fought the fire. One of the priorities was to keep the amount of sage-grouse habitat burned to a minimum.

By Gabriele Stiller, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany

Imaggeo is the EGU’s open access geosciences image repository. Photos uploaded to Imaggeo can be used by scientists, the press and the public provided the original author is credited. Photographers also retain full rights of use, as Imaggeo images are licensed and distributed by the EGU under a Creative Commons licence. You can submit your photos here.

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